For the Love of Money…

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For many younger people today, their first introduction to the O’Jays group from the 1950’s was the popular theme song for the Apprentice Show with Donald Trump entitled: ‘For the Love of Money’.

The song carried a warning about letting money rule you or fool you and spoke about the many unsavory things that money appears to be able to make people do.

 

 

Money money money money, money (x6)
Some people got to have it
Some people really need it
Listen to me y’all, do things, do things, do bad things with it
You wanna do things, do things, do things, good things with it
Talk about cash money, money
Talk about cash money- dollar bills, yall

For the love of money
People will steal from their mother
For the love of money
People will rob their own brother
For the love of money
People can’t even walk the street
Because they never know who in the world they’re gonna beat
For that lean, mean, mean green
Almighty dollar, money
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Money can be a harsh task master.  Jesus understood this and personified the way in which the love of money could control people.  In Matthew 6:24, the implication is that money is potentially so powerful in its ability to influence and control human beings that we cannot serve both God and Money at the same time.

Mathew 6:24: “No one can serve two masters; for either he will hate the one and love the other, or he will be devoted to one and despise the other. You cannot serve God and wealth.

Contrary to what we think and how we try to live our lives, it’s not really possible to have a divided mind.  Ultimately, we choose one thing or the other.

What might it mean to be in the service of money?  And if money is a harsh task master, is there a potential for it to be a dutiful servant?  Let’s take a look at the context of the verse on money with the verse that directly precedes it.

Mathew 6:23″But if your eye is bad, your whole body will be full of darkness. If then the light that is in you is darkness, how great is the darkness!

I find it interesting that Jesus talks about darkness just before he goes into a discussion about money.  In verse 23, he talks about the lamp being the eye of the body and that if the eye is dark, the whole body will be dark.  Could He have been pointing to a link between the two areas that we often don’t consciously link together – Spiritual insight and the way this impacts our relationship with money?  Perhaps Jesus is indicating that how we see and use money is related to whether our view of life as a whole is clear and unobstructed.

Growing up, my parents always told me that money was simply a means of exchange.  As I got older, I began to understand that money could be exchanged for a lot of things…goods, services, talents, ideas, physical labor etc.  Money represents to some extent that which is given in exchange for something of value with regards to human potential and productivity.  Because this is an inexact science, there is an inbuilt inequality about the distribution of money in the sense that there is a lot of discretionary judgement that must go into the issue of judging the value of an individual’s contribution.  It is also fraught with the danger of greed and the desire to take advantage of others.  Thus when Jesus speaks about the darkness of the eye one can see that He is right on point.  If our view is darkened, there is no way we can arrive at a right view or valuation of anything.

If we rightly understand that we are Children of God, created by Him and valued by Him in ways that cannot be defined within the narrow perimeters of human judgement and its necessary collary – money, we have the opportunity to enter into another type of freedom.  One which is not tethered to an invalid premisis from the onset.  No longer is self-worth designated by the amount of money that we or anyone makes.  We may now find that Money has the potential to become a Servant, rather than a taskmaster.  Money, when used wisely and with clear perspective can be an agent of good in the service of mankind and creation. But right perspective, insight and wisdom are necessary to provide the right understanding on how to use it rather than be used and ruled by it.

The Cure for Donkey Kong Foolishness…

29671794_sI am thankful for the growing realisation that much of what causes angst and grief in our lives is not personal.  It may feel personal because we experience it within our personal space. Yet if we are able to step back out of the heat within the moment, we may find that the perceived assault, attack or insult may indeed have little to do with us. Or we may discover that we have set out on a very foolish or unwise path which guarantees chaotic grief to anyone who insists on continuing in that particular direction.

Becoming thankful as a verb means choosing to actively engage tense and difficult moments as an opportunity to gain wisdom.  I’ve found that some of life’s most teachable moments are draped within the unconventional garb of emotionally charged exchanges.  When examined in clearer context, these situation often have a larger context which may not be initially visible.  And then… Sometimes life just is simply what it is.

When the fault is mine, becoming thankful for the course correction makes regaining equilibrium easier and minimizes the loss of vested emotional, spiritual and mental energy.  On this note, I am reminded of the experience of one hapless prophet and his improbable tutor – one very stubborn talking donkey as the story  is told in the book of Numbers 22:1-39.

Balam’s reckless journey to curse the Israelites as commissioned by Balak is interrupted by an angel threatening to end his life. Unfortunately, Balam is blind to the danger right in front of him.  Fortunately his donkey is not!  After beating the hapless beast repeatedly, the donkey finds a voice and has a conversation with Balam about his angry response.

It is only then that Balam’s yes are opened to his foolishness. He also sees the angel with a sword who is about to chop him into minced meat to punish him for messing with the wrong people!  The stunned prophet ends up having a conversation with both a donkey and an angel about the dubious course he seems hell-bent on taking. Suddenly the resistance of that donkey became something to be very grateful for!

Sometimes, it takes the bizarre elements of life to awaken us to the fact that we have much to become thankful for.  Becoming thankful as a way of responding to obstacles may actually awaken the power of grace and God’s protection in the midst of seemingly insurmountable difficulty.

A Pardox: Seeing Eyes Blind, Blind Eyes See

6974974_sWhen you flip open your eyelids in the morning and take stock of your environment, you have actually completed an exceptional feat; one which most of us take for granted. The body is a marvelous instrument.  The process by which light is projected into the eye and reflected back through a complex interaction between the brain, nerve impulses and the various chambers of the eye is truly amazing.

It is also unique to each individual.  While all of us may be looking at the same scene, we do not all see things in the same way.  The interpretation which occurs in each of us gives us a peculiar vantage point.  Our communication reflects this reality when we say things like, “I see that differently than you do.”

The ability to see is not limited to the physical realm.  We are in our essence spiritual beings.  We can also see with the eyes of our spirit, an ability which is sometimes referred to as our intuition.  We have all experienced to varying degrees an instinctive reaction to an individual when we first meet them that has nothing to do with our personal interactions.  Mothers know when something is wrong with a child even when the baby cannot speak.

This morning, my meditation was from one of the books which chronicled the exploits of various ancient Israeli kings and the prophets who operated during their reigns.  I was reading about a military assault against Israel by the army from Aram.  As the campaign gained traction, the King of Aram soon became uncomfortably aware that his plans and movements seemed to be closely monitored and communicated with the King of Israel.  Convinced that there was a traitor in his camp, he confronted his leaders.  They told him that Elisha, a prophet literally had ‘eyes on the inside’ and this was the reason why the King of Aram’s plans were continually revealed in advance to the King of Israel.

Elisha was not physically present, yet he could see realities that were unseen.  The King and his army thought they saw. They were convinced that Israel was in a pitiful state and would easily succumb to the vastness of their military might.  In a fascinating twist, the tables are turned in a most improbable way.  As the army of Aram begins to march towards Israel, Elisha’s servant cries out in dismay because his physical eyes see the destruction which is about to be visited on them.

But Elisha asks God to open his servants eyes.  Eyes that seemed to be open, but were actually blind.  When the servants eyes were opened, he was stunned to see that the army coming against Israel was nothing in comparison to the spiritual army that was guarding Israel.  The story ends with the army being struck with blindness and led by Elisha right into the presence of the King they thought they had come to capture!

The experience of both the army and the servant of Elisha are symbolic of situations which we experience.  We are prone to being blinded by arrogance and pride like the soldiers and by fear like Elisha’s servant.  Both types of blindness are rooted in ignorance of who God is and how he operates.  The Bible tells us that the ‘Fear of God is the beginning of wisdom’.  When blind eyes are opened, we become aware of how truly helpless our situation is without God and how powerful God is within our midst.  He is truly able to do exceedingly abundantly beyond what we could even think of, see or imagine.

Right seeing operates through different filters.  These are the filters of wisdom, love, compassion and grace.  Right seeing enables us to have the courage and boldness to fulfill God’s purpose for our lives with confidence that He is able to see us through.

In the final scene from the story as the King of Israel finds himself faced with an entire army that has effectively surrendered to him, Elisha helps him to see that the right response is not vengeance, but to bless those who are enemies of Israel with kindness and a meal, sending them home unharmed.

During a time in which our nation is inflamed by the hurt of racism and perceived injustice, and many are viewing  through lenses clouded by hurt and hate, let us pray that we be given the grace to see aright. That we have the courage and boldness to  enact that which brings wholeness and healing rather than division and strife.

To Read the entire story of the Elisha and the army from Aram, click here. (2 Kings 6: 8-22)